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Fahmi Rahmadiputra Rahmadiputra desde Méligny-le-Grand, Francia desde Méligny-le-Grand, Francia

Lector Fahmi Rahmadiputra Rahmadiputra desde Méligny-le-Grand, Francia

Fahmi Rahmadiputra Rahmadiputra desde Méligny-le-Grand, Francia

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Me gustaría un perro llamado Sr. Rochester.

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Me gusta el estilo de Jay McInerney. En general, me gustan los libros que están más estructurados, pero había algo en la forma en que McInerney colocó las palabras en el papel que me hizo seguir leyendo. Estas son mis líneas favoritas que creo que resumen la situación del protagonista: "Algo cambió. línea deja de acelerar ". Para mí, 'Bright Lights, Big City' tiene más que ver con la pérdida que con las drogas y la escena del club nocturno de los 80. El protagonista pasa la mayor parte de la novela girando y haciendo cosas que lamenta por la pérdida de dos mujeres (una más importante que la otra) en su vida.

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Originally published on The Librarian Next Door: Moving to Isla Huesos was supposed to be a fresh start for Pierce Oliviera and her mother, a new chance to remake their lives after her parents’ divorce and Pierce’s “incident.” But Pierce isn’t convinced she’s capable of a fresh start, since trouble seems to follow ever everywhere – ever since she died two years ago. For Pierce, there was no bright white light or chorus of heavenly angels. Just a dark, mysterious place with an even darker, more mysterious young man. Despite the fact that he seems to show up just when she needs him, Pierce is confused and wary about John. She knows she’s met him before – when she died – but no one else seems to believe her. What does he want with her? Could he be causing all the trouble she seems to attract? And if so, how can she possibly protect herself from someone who may not even be alive? Bookworms, let us please take a minute to hail and praise the genius that is Meg Cabot. *pauses* Meg Cabot has once again used her magic skills to create a thrilling, exciting, original and addictive novel with Abandon. This dark, mysterious story adds a contemporary update and twist to the classical Greek myth of Persephone and Hades. Drawing on a rich literary heritage (from the legends that inspired Pierce’s story, to the quotes from Dante that begin each chapter), Cabot is a smarty-pants who has written an intelligent and clever book that’s captivating and entertaining as well. In particular, the lush tropical setting – which you wouldn’t usually associate with death and the Underworld – comes alive in Abandon, as Cabot relies on the real history of the Florida Keys to bring depth to the story. As the first book in a planned trilogy, Abandon can be a frustrating novel because there is a lot of back story and foundation, but more questions than answers. Pierce’s story is a bit slow to start, as Cabot builds up Pierce’s world, with a fluid, non-linear narrative. Pierce narrates the story and recounts everything that has happened so far, resulting in jumps in time as she sifts through memories and recalls the events that led her to Isla Huesos. It’s up to the reader to follow the various flashbacks and piece together Pierce’s story in order to figure out what might happen next. Cabot is brilliant in giving her readers just enough information to tantalize them, while still withholding enough to ensure that they keep reading. Abandon is extremely readable and difficult to put down. I became so engrossed in the book that I stayed up way past my bedtime several nights in a row for “just a few more pages.” One of the things I’ve always loved about Meg Cabot is how very real her characters always seem. They’re flawed and imperfect, with their own personality quirks and neuroses, and Abandon is no exception. As the narrator of the story, Pierce struggles to make sense of the things she doesn’t understand in a completely relatable way. She tries so hard to be sensible and pragmatic as her world spins out of control, while still doing everything she can to help the people she loves. John, meanwhile, is brooding and moody, vaguely threatening and volatile – exactly what you’d expect from the ruler of the Underworld. He’s also pretty damn sexy and it’s hard for anyone – Pierce or the reader – to ignore his enigmatic appeal. (I don’t want to die, but after reading Abandon, I know I’d consider spending eternity with him.) Cabot’s supporting characters are just as well-developed and I’m looking forward to figuring out how they all fit together in the larger story. I have a lot of questions I want answered, most revolving around Pierce’s family secrets, the sexton Richard Smith and that necklace that seems to have special powers. Meg Cabot has completely enthralled me with Abandon and I can’t wait for the next book. P.S. How gorgeous is that cover? Beautiful.