danidogliani

Daniela Dogliani Dogliani desde Revma 811 03, Grecia desde Revma 811 03, Grecia

Lector Daniela Dogliani Dogliani desde Revma 811 03, Grecia

Daniela Dogliani Dogliani desde Revma 811 03, Grecia

danidogliani

It’s incomprehensible to imagine what Wilbert Rideau, and prisoners like him, went through during his incarceration in the infamous Angola prison in Louisiana. In an era where racial equality was non-existent, where 85% of the prison’s population were black – later that was reduced to an 80-20% ratio – and the prison run by “rednecks”, I find it miraculous that he managed not only to successfully educate himself but to rehabilitate to such a degree that made him the envy of many journalists and scholars in America. By 1988 and having served four times longer than the national average for prisoners it became clear to Wilbert, if he hadn’t realised before, that he was being singled out for killing a white woman. When he was sentenced to death in 1962 he was one of 13 prisoners on death row in Angola – of those he remained the only prisoner who had not been released. According to James Gill, a columnist for the Times-Picayune, Rideau was victimised – I have to say on reading his memoirs and recollections I wholeheartedly agree with him. “With probing intelligence but only a ninth-grade education, Rideau honed his acclaimed journalism skills inside Louisiana's notorious Angola prison. In 1961, at the age of 19, he killed a white woman in the course of a bank robbery. Sentenced to death, he was eventually given a life sentence after repeated appeals based on irregularities in his trial and national changes in policy regarding the death penalty. Rideau suffered years on death row and in solitary; once integrated into the broader population, he worked his way onto The Angolite, the prison publication. Eventually becoming editor, he earned the respect of the warden, prisoners, guards, as well as the broader journalism profession, with exposés of the politics and economics of the prison system, earning several prestigious press awards along the way. He struggled with journalistic principles in a highly charged environment in which all sides were hyper-partisan and often violent. After 44 years and scores of appeals lost to political machinations, Rideau was finally freed in 2005. This is more than a prison memoir; it is a searing indictment of the American justice system“ Full review on my blog - http://www.milorambles.com/2011/03/01...