awdec238

Awadh Aldeabi Aldeabi desde Châtillon-en-Dunois, Francia desde Châtillon-en-Dunois, Francia

Lector Awadh Aldeabi Aldeabi desde Châtillon-en-Dunois, Francia

Awadh Aldeabi Aldeabi desde Châtillon-en-Dunois, Francia

awdec238

Me encantan todas esas cosas de espías del gobierno. buena lectura.

awdec238

The book is a measured, thoughtful and well-researched view of the period between childhood and commitment to the church (or leaving the church) that the Amish call rumspringa - literally 'running around'. Everything is permitted for these teens and early twenties, or if not exactly permitted, then not forbidden. As an anabaptist sect, the Amish believe that baptism must be entered into freely by an adult, in full knowledge of the alternative, 'English' or mainstream America. This baptism is an unbreakable commitment to the Church and not, as the Baptist sects believe, any guarantee of an eternal dwelling in heaven. After reading the book, which is written from the point of view of an interested and not-unsympathetic mainstream American, I have a great deal of respect from the Amish's ideas of community and how to maintain it, of their pacifist and non-judgmental stance and forgiveness of all acts by their children, no matter how against their ethics and even the law, during their rumspringa. It is difficult, however, to sympathise with the extreme submissiveness and abnegation of all self-determination of the women, and their insistence on only the most basic of formal education ending at 14. The various bans on electricity, telephones and motors in most circumstances but not all seem hypocritical. It strikes me as ridiculous that ownership and driving of cars (outside of rumspringa) are forbidden, but riding in them and hiring them with a driver isn't. Needless to say, most religions have these strange little peculiarities, but generally they aren't so obvious as with the Amish. This is a good book, deep, interesting and well-written. Its a slice of America that is generally regarded as quaint, antiquated and a bit of a tourist show. Nothing could be further from the truth. The Amish are a thriving, growing religion that is deeply introspective and cares little what the world thinks of it.

awdec238

I loved both the book and the movies. The secret garden is a feel good book. About how a little girl changes the world of a boy and his rich but sad father. Who's mother died in a garden now locked behind a secret door. A must read.

awdec238

Gentle. And sweet. Interesting words to describe a book called "The Graveyard Book." It is for a young audience but adults will enjoy the grave as well and will feel safe there, which is an interesting feeling to feel. I really enjoyed the characters. Especially Silas. Liza was great, too. I wish that there was more elaboration on some of the events. The book could have been much longer and more detailed and I would have loved it.