arslizonda

Liza Arsenteva Arsenteva desde Nueva York desde Nueva York

Lector Liza Arsenteva Arsenteva desde Nueva York

Liza Arsenteva Arsenteva desde Nueva York

arslizonda

Este fue el primer libro de Sandman que recibí alrededor de los 10 u 11 años. Mi hermana mayor pegó tarjetas de índice sobre las partes "inapropiadas" para que mi madre me dejara leerlo.

arslizonda

No hay duda de que Rebecca Wolff sabe cómo elaborar el idioma. Y, además, ella teje un hechizo aquí. ¿Es el hechizo entre el lector y Wolff? ¿O entre los 15 años de edad, Ginger y Motherwells, la extraña pareja nueva en la ciudad? Después de todo, esta es una ciudad con una historia de brujería. También hay una tensión sexual que vibra a lo largo del libro. Esta es una historia de la mayoría de edad que te traerá el dolor de la adolescencia.

arslizonda

Disfruté este libro, el final fue un poco cursi porque estaba envuelto en una bonita reverencia, pero es una buena lectura.

arslizonda

Este es un gran libro. El autor es muy descriptivo y usted puede ayudar a involucrarse tanto en la vida de los personajes.

arslizonda

WOW. That is all I can say. WOW. If you haven't read this book, I urge you to do so.

arslizonda

I expected this to be an alarming, eye-opening book based on its premise: that the author would take whatever low-paying, entry-level position she was able to find in three different American cities (Key West; Portland, Maine; and Minneapolis), and struggle to scrape by. Ehrenreich lost credibility to me as soon as she revealed--five pages in--that she had extra money with her and would never allow herself to go hungry or be homeless in the way many in a similar situation might if things went wrong. From there, the rest of the book seemed like some sort of game, which quite frankly I found to be insulting, both to her readers and to the millions of Americans who, unlike Ehrenreich, have no extra money squirreled away and no comfortable other life to sneak back to on the weekends. Whether she was waitressing, cleaning houses, or working at Wal-Mart, she always maintained a condescending tone and worried about what would happen if she blew her cover instead of feeling any sort of compassion for any of the people she encountered. What I found most disturbing, though, was that at the end of these three month-long "experiments," she returns to her life seeming completely unchanged. I would've expected her to be humbled or extremely thankful for the luxuries she's able to afford, but she's not. She's quick to complain about the economy and quick to criticize the upper- and upper-middle class, but what she's not quick to offer is any sort of solution. In the end, she's left looking like a hypocrite, and I'm left wishing I'd spent a Sunday reading a better book.

arslizonda

I enjoyed this book, and it helped me to hear other womens stories and pick up info and help myself "heal". I read other reviews who this author has a child and so I didn't read her introduction or the "Personal Note" because I didn't want to hear about it lol... Overall a good book, and like I said helped me decide some things.